Monday, January 01, 2007

Bottomless Steamed Wonton Shrimp



Adapted from Rasa Malyasia's Shrimp wontons. I even took lessons from Rasa Malyasia's wonton wrapping cooking video. :)

I tried steaming the little shrimp with my Black and Decker steamer. I got it as a wedding gift. :) I've used it to steam veggies but I thought I'd venture off and try this. The only problem is the wonton sticks to the plastic so the little bottoms fell off hence the name ;). Does anyone know what the difference is between using this type of steamer vs stainless steel or a bamboo one?

I want to start making little steamed goodies. yum yum. And was wondering if I should invest or will this do?

10 comments:

Rasa Malaysia said...

You are indeed a budding cook...I am very proud of you.

I have never used a steamer. I usually just use my wok, fill it up with water, and put a bowl or something that would hold the plate with whatever I wanted to steam. Cover the wok and steam. It works pretty well for me.

simcooks said...

You can put the wontons on big pieces of lettuce leaves so that they won't stick.

I also don't have a steamer. I just use a big pot, fill it with some water, place my plate on a 3-legged stand and steam.

I had considered buying a bamboo steamer before (so that I can stack) but decided against it as I usually don't need to steam too many dishes at once. Also, with bamboo, u need to keep them very dry after washing or there will be bacteria.

tigerfish said...

I think I also own of those steamers you are talking about. But I have not tried steaming wontons or "skin-related" food in there. I steamed meat once in there, and use 2 pieces of napa cabbage as the base of my meat so that it won't stick, plus, the cabbage adds some sweetness to the dish :)

BuddingCook said...

rasa, sim, tiger - thanks for the advice! i'm pretty certain cabbage or salad will work. :) now i'm excited to make my steamed goodies. i'll give it a try next time. :D

Wandering Chopsticks said...

You can also just lightly oil the bottom of the pan. :P

Are you putting the wontons on a container and then into the steamer? If not, the problem with the American steamers is that too much water stays on the bottom of the plastic. Steaming in a pot, the water drips down the sides so there's not so much pooling at the bottom. I don't know if that made sense?

Wandering Chopsticks said...

OK, I just saw the picture of the wontons in your steamer. Next time, just put a small plate with the wontons on top. The plate will be elevated enough that steam can still come up and down, but keep the water from pooling all onto the plastic holes. I hope that helps!

BuddingCook said...

thanks wandering chopsticks i will try this method too! :)

Melting Wok said...

hi budding, I'm sure you've mastered your wonton steaming skills by now :) What I usually do is to boil "very" little water in a pot with little oil, dump the wontons in, water level should just cover a little over half of the wontons that's sitting in the pot, let boil, & then remove the water, add the same amount of "room temp./cold" water as before,( using cold water would allow your wonton wraps to stay preety, firm & not soggy afterwards ). Let boil, & then cook for another 10-15 minutes on low heat. Not only your wontons remains tasty as you would have steam them, the end result would be pleasing to you as they do not stick on the pot at all. If you are detrimental on steaming, I usually spray some cooking spray over it, & volla ! :)

BuddingCook said...

melting wok - i will try boiling them one of these days too. thanks for visiting. :D

Tongue in Cheek Antiques said...

Great idea to have the pictures pop up like this...I feel I am flipping through pages of a book!
Thank you for coming by my blog and leading me here!!